Dhaka, Bangladesh
Antigen test seen urgent as Bangladesh corona casualties surge

Antigen test seen urgent as Bangladesh corona casualties surge

39 die in 24hrs, infections above 2100

News Report: Suggestion for introducing the blocked rapid antigen test grows louder as corona death curve waved up again in Bangladesh as health officials Wednesday reported 39 deaths while infection rate also stayed high after little fall. Medics suggest rapid antigen tests for effective combat against the winter-season resurgence of the virus, as many countries, including neighboring India, have gone for wide-scale tests and are getting results in containing contagion. The United States has allowed rapid home antigen test to tackle an exigency stemming from a second wave of the pandemic virus SARS CoV-2 that causes the covid-19 disease. Bangladesh daily corona cases and deaths both surged up as health officials Wednesday reported 2,156 fresh cases with 39 deaths, warranting preventive actions and rapid tests ahead of winter. China was world’s first country which on January 11 reported the first death from the novel coronavirus in Wuhan, the capital of Central China’s Hubei province. The pandemic is showing signs of a resurgence in a number of countries, prompting fresh lockdowns or tighter restrictions though people are growing corona-fatigued and defiant. England reverted to a month-long lockdown with provisions of assistance for people in home stay, as did some other western countries, as the pandemic makes resurgence in a second wave in winter. Public-health experts are ringing the alarm bell about a winter wave of the viral transmission and the government ordered tightening health rules making mask use compulsory as multitudes of people move bare-face. A vaccine deal also has been signed with the Indian Serum Institute. In the meantime, the country received confirmation of receiving vaccines from the global vaccine alliance COVAX under the WHO. They suggest increasing tests and decreasing the infection and death rates. "Tests ought to be increased hugely," said former health minister Prof Dr Ruhal Haque, stressing the urgency of introducing the stalled antigen and antibody tests to fight the feared second wave of the virus. One suggestion is for holding down the infection rate below 5.0 percent and death rate below 1.0 percent to come to grips with the pandemic virus. Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina again has sounded alarm about an apprehended winter surge in the virus transmission, and said hospitals and medics were being readied to face any such exigency Experts suggest tightening lax containment measures, particularly wearing mask and washing hands, which can help check any resurgence ahead. Some senior medics, meanwhile, perceive some sort of 'herd immunity' through cluster infections with mild forms of the virus in concentrated-population spots, and suggest follow-up medical measures through antigen and antibody tests. Suggestions for stricter containment action come as people are moving out oblivious of protection rules. However, indications were rife about launching antigen tests, which will help gauge real situation of the pandemic in the country, including if localized herd immunity is taking place. The virus is still prevalent, although people here, and also elsewhere, are getting corona-care-fatigued and careless about its attack because of hard realities of life and business. "People are becoming oblivious of the fact that coronavirus was once here in this country," said Prof Dr ABM Abdullah. He also viewed that people are moving out in view of economic realities, for livelihood. Latest views from some medics have it that corona can also be made to die out and go the way its predecessors SARS and MERS and Ebola went . They suggest strengthening non- pharmaceutical interventions and beginning both antigen and antibody tests, spreading indigenous medication alongside booking effective vaccines to have those when ready. Such measures are deemed urgent to ward off a feared winter wave of transmission of the virus. "In Bangladesh, multitudes of people are moving sans facemask on, eating food or sipping tea from kiosks carefree and buses carrying passengers standing as scare of corona appears to be dissipating from their mind although casualties are still reported rather high," says many a medical analyst. As likely as not, the novel coronavirus that is still ravaging the planet can become one of seasonal flus which a nasal spray can control and cold cures can cure. Such an indication was latent in a World Health Organization (WHO) executive's observations on the metamorphic destiny of the current pandemic while, of late, two countries claimed advances in inventing nasal spray as a substitute for vaccines. The potential good news came while hordes of medical scientists, virologists and medical multinationals are engrossed in evolving, doing human trials and manufacturing vaccines while plutocrats in rich countries advance booking of the innoculates by spending billions of dollars. While winter is in the offing and the western countries are gearing up for combat against a second or third wave of transmission in the 'flu season', World Health Organization (WHO) Regional Director for Europe Hans Kluge was not ruling out the possibility that the coronavirus can become a seasonal infection. He in an interview with TASS in Moscow recently underlined that coronaviruses belong to the same group as influenza viruses. “So, in that sense it could become seasonal,” he said. In Bangladesh, villagers in rural areas brave it and townspeople, particularly the commoners, are also largely reverting to old habits. "No corona in villages," said a number of rural correspondents. Many even in the capital city, Dhaka, are not using facemasks and not hand-washing either, although there has been alert from government high quarters and medical experts about a resurgence. In late December 2019, Chinese officials informed the World Health Organization (WHO) about the outbreak of a previously unknown pneumonia in the city of Wuhan, in central China. Since then, cases of the novel coronavirus – named COVID-19 by the WHO – have been reported in every corner of the world. On March 11, 2020, the WHO declared the coronavirus outbreak a pandemic. Reports say the novel coronavirus or covid-19, the deadliest one since the 1918 Spanish flu that took 50 million lives, is one of the animal flus in the genotype SARS or severe acute respiratory syndrome. SARS-CoV, the virus that caused SARS, was first identified in 2003. MERS-CoV, the virus that caused Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS), was first identified in 2012. SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, was identified in 2019 and continued afflicting mankind. With agency inputs

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