Dhaka, Bangladesh
Virus effect on wildlife efforts

Virus effect on wildlife efforts

According to the United Nations World Tourism Organisation, (UNWTO), global tourism has been seriously impacted due to the pandemic and millions of jobs have been lost in this industry. The Covid-19 pandemichas spread to all corners of the globe,ravaging life, livelihoods, and the economy.As a result, most nations have implemented various levels of lockdown torestrictindustrial output, vehicular transport, and gatherings of people to ensure social distancing. The positive environmental consequences of this lockdown are conspicuous. There is a marked improvement in worldwide air quality, animals are meandering to places they would not usually be seen, and the water in rivers has become cleaner.But haswildlife conservation been equally fortunate? Invariably, the lockdown and accompanying governmental decisions have had a seriousimpact on the socioeconomic conditions in many developing nations. In India, particularly, migrant workers are amongst the worst hit. Over the past few months, there has been a mass exodus of migrant workers from metropolitan cities such as Delhi, Mumbai, and Bangalore to parts of Uttar Pradesh, Bihar, and Jharkhand. Given the restrictions on movement and the economic slump, it is unlikely that migrant workers will be able to join their previous jobs. Amidst depleting finances and unemployment, these workers are likely to fall back on forest resources to augment their livelihood. As one can see from the accompanying illustration,wildlife conservation has multiple stakeholders: This trend is not limited to India. Reports suggest thatthere is a marked increase in deforestation in the Amazon Rain Forest in Brazil, after the start of the Covid-19 pandemic. In fact, there is a 50 per cent increase in the deforestation rate in the Brazilian Amazon during the first three months of 2020compared to the correspondingperiod of 2019. According to the United Nations World Tourism Organisation, (UNWTO), global tourism has been seriously impacted due to the pandemic and millions of jobs have been lost in this industry. As a result, in Africa, there isan increase in wildlife trafficking and bush-meat harvest linked to reduction in revenue from ecotourism. Likewise, the poaching of the critically endangered giant ibises in Cambodia has been linked to the collapse of local ecotourism.

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