Dhaka, Bangladesh
Here's why the royal family doesn't use a last name

Here's why the royal family doesn't use a last name

(From previous issue) He made the switch because of anti-German sentiments brewing at the start of World War I (the Saxe-Coburg-Gotha name was of German origin). "Windsor" came from Windsor Castle, one of the royal family's properties. But he wasn't just changing the dynasty name. George V also specified that Windsor was to became the royal family's official surname, too. Today, the royal family is still known as the House of Windsor, and in a broad, general sense, Windsor is still the royal last name. When Queen Elizabeth II came to power, she made a slight modification. In 1947, princess Elizabeth (George V's granddaughter) married Philip Mountbatten, a former Greek and Danish prince who had joined the British Royal Navy. Just a few years later, the young couple were thrust to the very top of the monarchy: Elizabeth's father died, making her Queen Elizabeth II. Mountbatten became Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh. In 1960, Elizabeth and Philip decided that they wanted to differentiate their particular branch of the royal family tree from all the others. They decreed that their descendants would carry the hyphenated last name Mountbatten-Windsor. (To be continued)

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