Dhaka, Bangladesh
11 most isolated places at the end of the earth

11 most isolated places at the end of the earth

(From previous issue) 7. Tristan da Cuhna This remote island is volcanic, but that doesn't stop about 258 people from calling it home. And there are many creature comforts to be found on Tristan da Cunha, including stores, schools, churches, and a hospital. There is no electrical grid, but residents do have gas generators for power. The island was named by its discoverer, who gave the place his moniker but never actually set foot upon it. Today, the island is a British territory. To visit, you must plan carefully. It is a 1,732 mile boat ride from Cape Town, South Africa, and ships visit the island only 9 times per year. 8. Utqiagvik, Alaska (Barrow) This frigid city has two names. Barrow was the name given in honor of Sir John Barrow, 2nd Secretary of the British Admiralty, though it is not clear why. But archeological evidence suggests that people have been living there since at least AD 500. The native people call the city Utqiagvik. Despite the 3-month "warm" season consisting of temperatures around 36F (cold season averages 3F with 65 straight days of darkness), an impressive 4,429 people make their home in Utqiagvik. They heat their homes with natural gas and have water and sewer service, as well as phone, mail, radio, cable, and internet. There are hotels and restaurants. However, the city is only accessible via a 1 ½ hour plane ride from Anchorage. 9. La Rinconada, Peru Located high in the Andes Mountains, La Rinconada is the kind of place you might like to say you've been, but you won't want to linger long. At over 16,000 feet, it is the highest human habitation in the world. Visitors often experience symptoms of altitude sickness, including headaches, nausea, and shortness of breath. (To be continued)

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