Dhaka, Bangladesh
Oklahoma points the way to better quality of life

Oklahoma points the way to better quality of life

By Deborah Simmons

I was trying to determine the other day when U.S. Census takers might be in the D.C. region for the centennial head count. However, as occasionally happens when searching Google, a startling headline grabbed my attention after I entered the words "census facts" and clicked on a website. "Census estimates reveal blues for many blue states," screamed the headline on Oklahoman.com. Now, keep in mind that Oklahoma is not a blue state, so it can't lay claim to being a big market for professional sports or to being the birthplace of Motown, Hollywood, casinos or Wall Street; or to being the in place for skiing and surfing, Ivy League universities, and wine and coffee makers. Also, its governor and both U.S. senators are Republicans. Oklahoma is, well, Oklahoma, flyover country to most Americans and visitors from far-off lands. For further perspective, check a map (or globe, if your home or kids' school has access to such nondigital information). Oklahoma is the fist-shaped state in south-central United States that looks like its pointy finger is pointed westward. That's Oklahoma in a itsy-bitsy nutshell, and that's why the headline from the editorial board of the state's largest daily is worthy of attention. In a way, the first five paragraphs laid out a lighter shade of blue facing the Democratic Party this election year: "The facts and figures generated by the U.S. Census Bureau are often instructive, and that's certainly true of the bureau's latest population estimates. They underscore the point that sound fiscal policy matters. "Forty states saw their populations grow between 2018 and 2019. Ten states lost population during that time, and the list is a who's who of high-tax, high-regulation, Democrat-controlled states.

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