Dhaka, Bangladesh
Hook the book

Hook the book

March 2, is the birth anniversary of Dr. Seuss, who gave us stories that we can never forget. He took commonplace events and turned them into exciting stories for our reading pleasure. Marco walks down Mulberry Street to school and back. His father tells him: "Marco, keep your eyelids up And see what you can see." But, as luck would have it, the only thing Marco chances upon is a horse pulling a wagon. He realises that it is the most boring information he could give his father. Then, he hits upon an idea...he would make it more exciting. He imagines the horse is a zebra, or maybe a reindeer but what if it is an elephant? May be an elephant helped by two giraffes? But now, the wagon seems a bit boring. So, he changes it into a chariot, then a sled, then a cart holding a brass band. His imagination keeps growing till he is home. Rushing up the front steps, reality hits him. His father asks him: "Dad looked at me sharply and pulled at his chin. He frowned at me sternly' from there in his seat, "Was there nothing to look at ...no people to greet? Did nothing excite you or make your heart beat?" "Nothing," I said, growing red as a beet, But a plain horse and wagon on Mulberry Street." And To Think I Saw It on Mulberry Street was the first book written by Theodor Seuss Geisel. It was published under the pen name Dr. Seuss. Geisel got the idea for the book while he was aboard a ship. It was 1936, and he and his wife were returning from a vacation in Europe. The rhythm of the ship's engines captivated him and inspired the book's signature lines - And to think I saw it on Mulberry Street. Life and times Geisel was born in Springfield, Massachusetts, the U.S on March 2, 1904. His grandparents were German immigrants. He graduated from Dartmouth College and in his senior year, he was made editor-in-chief of the Dartmouth Jack-O-Lantern, a humour magazine. But, a misdemeanour in college caused him to resign from all extracurricular activities including the humour magazine. Going against the ruling, he continued to work at the magazine, signing his work with the pen name Dr. Suess. From Dartmouth, he went to Lincoln College, Oxford, hoping to earn a Ph.D. But through a quirk of fate, he did not get his Ph. D and instead, returned to America and began submitting his writings and drawings to magazines, book publishers and advertising agencies. He wrote his first book And to Think...in 1936. The manuscript was rejected by almost 43 publishers. Geisel says, he was walking home with his rejected manuscript, having decided to burn it when by chance he met a classmate from Dartmouth, who was working with Vanguard Press. And the rest, as they say is history! As World War II broke out, Geisel became an editorial cartoonist for a New York city daily newspaper. His cartoons were later published as Dr. Seuss Goes to War. After the war, he and his wife moved to California, where he returned to writing children's books. In May 1954, Life magazine carried a story about illiteracy among school children. The article came to the conclusion that this was so, because the books were boring. William Ellsworth Spaulding, the director of the education division of Houghton Mifflin, a publishing house compiled a list with 348 words. He asked Geisel to cut the list to 250 words and write a book using only those words. Spaulding challenged Geisel saying "bring back a book children can't put down". And thus was born The Cat in the Hat. Geisel died on September 24, 1991. Four years after his death, the University of California, San Diego's University Library Building was renamed Geisel Library. In 2002, the Dr. Seuss National Memorial Sculpture Garden opened in his birthplace of Springfield, Massachusetts, featuring sculptures of Geisel and many of his characters.

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