Dhaka, Bangladesh
Tech companies share responsibility to protect user privacy

Tech companies share responsibility to protect user privacy

SAN FRANCISCO, Oct. 9 (Xinhua): Tech companies, big or small, established or startups, should keep in mind their responsibilities and tech ethics to securely protect users’ data or other private information from being leaked, a Google executive said Sunday. In response to a question about cases of data leaks involving many companies in recent years, Peter Norvig, director of research at Google, told Xinhua that the key is that tech firms should put safety measures in place and make them available to everybody working in those companies. Although there are times when a company has the idea of having it move fast amid competition or market pressure, it has to slow down and double check its product before it is launched. For maximum protection of user data, “we have to go slower, and to some extent people complain about that. But it’s worth it to make sure that we get things right,” he said. “You’ve got to educate your whole workforce, (and) tell everybody it’s important to have quality in the product, and all these aspects are part of that quality,” he added. Companies should always be aware that there are threats out there they want to be actively protecting themselves against, he said. Norvig suggested that Chinese companies learn from the lessons of American companies and “think about the system from the ground up.” Companies should not allow unauthorized access to user data and avoid any risks of data leaking, he said. Norvig was joined by several other speakers from big U.S. and Chinese firms including Apple Inc. and Alibaba to discuss the future of computing and artificial intelligence (AI) at one of the panels of the annual Berkeley China Summit 2019. The daylong conference, which opened on Sunday, drew a host of prominent speakers, scholars and senior executives from big tech companies to talk about topics ranging from AI, computing, engineering to entrepreneurship, as well as their impact on innovation, media, entertainment and transportation. U.S. aerospace giant Boeing Company said Tuesday it delivered only five 737 aircraft in the third quarter 2019, 19 jets fewer than the figure reported in the previous quarter, due to an lingering impact of the global grounding of 737 MAX planes. The third-quarter delivery of its best-selling 737 aircraft also saw a big drop from the first quarter of 2019, while the company delivered 173 737 jets to commercial customers in the fourth quarter of last year. The sales of Boeing’s 737 single-aisle jets have suffered mass losses after two of its MAX models crashed in Indonesia last year and in Ethiopia in March 2019, respectively, killing 346 people on board. The two fatal incidents led to global grounding of MAX aircraft in mid-March as a result of widespread concern about the airplane’s safety and intense scrutiny from aviation and federal regulators. Boeing said it is still working with federal regulators to get approval to resume the service of 737 jets as soon as possible. Boeing is continuing to produce the 737 planes at its Renton plant in Washington state, but at a lower rate, and to store them in anticipation of an eventual end of the flying ban on the 737 models. Boeing delivered a total of 63 commercial aircraft in the third quarter of 2019, nose-diving by two-thirds from the figure of 193 a year ago. The company’s entire delivery of 302 jets by its commercial division in the first nine months of this year dropped by 47 percent from the corresponding period of 2018, when 568 aircraft were delivered to its customers.

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