Dhaka, Bangladesh
Quality treatment for children at district hospital in M’bazar

Quality treatment for children at district hospital in M’bazar

Our Correspondent MOULVIBAZAR, Sept 12: The 250-bed District Hospital in Moulvibazar is now playing a significant role in providing quality treatment facilities for women, labour, newborn babies and children, thanks to the authorities' special initiative that started in January 2017. Koloti Robidas, a worker of Baghacherra tea garden in Kamolganj upazila of the district, said her second baby was born at the hospital a few days ago. "As the baby was facing some problems, doctors took him to special care unit. And he became normal within a few hours," she said. Ironically, her first baby died shortly after birth at the same hospital three years ago. "I think my first baby would also remain alive if there was quality treatment at this hospital that time," said Koloti. Joynal Abedin, a resident of Pachgaon village in Rajnagor upazila, said after knowing from ultrasonogram report that his wife would give birth to twin babies he came to the hospital to know the facilities. "As I learnt that there are adequate treatment facilities at the children's ward and modern special care unit for newborn babies at the hospital I admitted my wife here on August 8 and the twins were born the next day. Now the mother and babies are okay," he said. "Unaware of the treatment facilities here, many people go to Sylhet MAG Osmani Medical College Hospital," he added. Momtaj Begum, 43, a resident of Giasnagor village in Sadar upazila, said she admitted her kid to the 250-bed district hospital five days ago and authorities discharged her after completion of treatment on Thursday. "My kid was treated at Green zone of the ward as a normal patient. For the first time in life, I have seen such a colourful hospital ward. Earlier I had seen it in movies," she added. Partho Sarathi Datta Kanungo, superintendent of Moulvibazar district hospital, told this correspondent, "After joining here a few years ago, I saw that many newborn babies, especially premature ones, face problems, including breathing difficulties, feeding problem and low weight." "It was painful to hear that a few babies died on the way after we referred them to Sylhet MAG Osmani Medical College Hospital for better treatment on different occasions. After long observation and planning, we started a modern special care unit for newborn babies. Simultaneously colourful children's ward was established for providing better treatment to kids. UNICEF supports us to run this programme," he said. "Considering the health conditions of children, we have made three categories of arrangement under Red, Orange and Green zones and painted those with respective colours. "After check-ups, patients in danger are admitted to Red zone where they are under full time supervision of nurses and doctors. When they show considerable improvement they are taken to Orange zone while Green zone is for those who are under care prior to discharging," said the hospital superintendent. According to the information provided by Moulvibazar district hospital, 99 kids died at the hospital in 2016 while the number came down to 63 and 34 in 2017 and 2018 respectively. Despite all these shortcomings, the 250-bed hospital is providing healthcare to around 700 people who come to the outdoor facility every day on an average. Several patients who were waiting on queue at the outdoor services told the Dhaka Tribune that they had to buy only a Tk5 ticket to see doctors at the hospital. Seeing the same doctors at their private chambers would have cost them Tk500, they said. A patient who was suffering from abdominal pain said he had to pay only Tk200 for an ultrasonogram at the hospital, while the same test would cost Tk800 elsewhere. Another kidney patient told the Dhaka Tribune that he earlier had to regularly travel to Sylhet for dialysis; but since the dialysis department opened at the 250-bed hospital, it has saved him a lot of money and time. Several other patients praised the hospital's diagnostic facilities, saying that machines and the technicians were skilled in carrying out all medical tests. The hospital, however, fails to live up to its true potential. There are plenty of equipments available, but no one skilled enough to use them. The coronary care unit of the hospital is ready for use, but has not been operational yet. The same is true for a 15-bed neonatal intensive care unit. There is no scope for an endoscopy, while the digital x-ray machine has been out of order for a long time. One of the two ambulances of the hospital also remains broken down, allowing an outside syndicate to pressure patients into using private ambulance services.

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