Dhaka, Bangladesh
Good riddance, Boris Johnson

Good riddance, Boris Johnson

The resignation of Britain's foreign secretary could make it easier for Prime Minister Theresa May to reach a more reasonable agreement on Brexit, writes the Editorial commentator of The New York Times . Britain's foreign secretary and its chief Brexit negotiator caused quite a stir when they resigned within 24 hours of each other because they considered Prime Minister Theresa May's Brexit proposal too accommodating to Europe. But if her government weathers the resulting storm, their departures could help resolve the tortuous divorce negotiations with the European Union, which are approaching crucial deadlines. Though details are still to come, the plan would have Britain try to enter into a free-trade agreement with the bloc by a "common rule book for industrial goods and agricultural products," and accept partial jurisdiction by the European Court of Justice.Not surprisingly, Mrs. May's chief Brexit negotiator, David Davis, a proponent of a "hard Brexit," quit on Sunday, along with his deputy. The greater shock came on Monday, when the flamboyant foreign secretary, Boris Johnson, followed suit. Mr. Johnson had been a fierce advocate of a total break with the European Union, and during the Brexit referendum campaign he notoriously spread the false claim that Britain would save more than 350 million pounds a week if it left the union. Britain will officially leave the union next March, but for the exit not to be a total disaster for Britain, the two sides need to agree on a broad range of issues by October, including the terms of transition, customs arrangements and the basic shape of a future trade relationship. The deal, moreover, needs the approval of the British Parliament and 27 European Union members. Time is running out. — The New York Times

Share |