Dhaka, Bangladesh
Ethnic rebellions in Myanmar

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Ethnic rebellions in Myanmar

After fighting flared in April between the Burmese army and the Kachin Independence Army (KIA), an insurgent force controlling much of Myanmar's northern extremities, thousands of civilians fled into the jungle Some trekked for weeks before reaching Myitkyina, the capital of the Kachin state, where they have taken refuge in a local church. The Editorial commentator of the Economist feels that the government tin Myanmar sits by while the army goes on the offensive. Violence is nothing new in this part of Myanamr. The war in The war in the KLachin sate has rumbled on since a ceasefire broke down between the Burmese b army and the KIA in 2011. Dozens of similar guerilla groups representing downtrodden ethnic minorities have been fighting the central government demanding greater autonomy. Many agreed to nationwide ceasefire in 2015, but the KIA with at least 10,000 troops has not. It is hard to identify the trigger for the latest violence. The generals, naturally, put the blame on the rebels. But the army routinely attacks rebel outposts during the dry season. Outraged by the army's belligerence, a group of Kachin youths held protests in Myitkyina, The army sued the organisers for defamations. Civilians caught in the crossfire bear the brunt of it all. Aung San Suu Kyi, Myanmar's de facto leader since 2016, says peace is her priority. She has organized grand conferences and delivered speeches about unity. But little has changed on the front lines That is mainly the army's fault. But her government still looks hapless. At the very least Ms Suu Kyi could denounce the army and call for an end to attacks instead of keeping silent. In the past she has even praised the army's "valiant effort" to stabilize the region. — The Economist

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