Dhaka, Bangladesh
Most of hypertensive patients unaware, don't take medicines

Most of hypertensive patients unaware, don't take medicines

News Report The country observed the World Hypertension Day on Thursday like other countries in the globe with the theme of "Know Your Numbers with a goal of increasing high blood pressure (BP) awareness in all populations around the world". According to the experts, the recommended blood pressure for a healthy person is less than 140/90 mmHg. If there is any change in blood pressure, a person should contact a doctor immediately. They warn that the risk of hypertension has gradually been increasing across the world. Experts suggested the patients to walk at least for half an hour, control the weight and limit the diet to check high blood pressure. The World Hypertension Day was first observed on May 17, 2005 by The World Hypertension League (WHL) and since then it has been celebrating every year to create awareness about the hypertension diseases. This day (World Hypertension Day) was designated and initiated by The World Hypertension League (WHL), a canopy organisation of 85 national hypertension societies and leagues. UNB adds: Two-third of the Bangladeshi hypertensive patients does not take regular medicine and are at high risk of developing the fatal diseases, experts said at a city seminar on Thursday. Some of the seminar speakers referred to the Bangladesh Health and Demographic Survey 2011 report to note that one third of the adults of the age group of 35-80 years have hypertension but half of them are unaware of it. In observance of the World Hypertension Day on Thursday, icddr,b in league with the Non Communicable Diseases (NCD) Control Programme of Directorate General of Health Services (DGHS) organised the seminar - 'Hypertension! The Silent Killer! Reaching the Unreached'- at Sasakawa Auditorium of icddr,b. The seminar participants said stroke and heart attack are the two major causes of deaths from NCD in Bangladesh and uncontrolled hypertension is the major risk for the both. Early detection of hypertension and changing lifestyle can tackle hypertension without taking medicines. Professor Tazeen H Jafar of DUKE-NUS Medical School of Singapore said, "Health systems have been conventionally focused on infectious diseases and have neglected chronic diseases, which have become very, very important." Dr. Abdul Alim, Deputy Programme Manager, NCDC Programme, DGHS presented the overview of the government's programme on NCD. He highlighted NCDC Operational Plan in Health,Nutrition, and Population Program(HNPSP), referral services at the primary level and the guidelines of the government. Professor Sohel Reza Choudhury, National Heart Foundation Hospital and Research Institute, Professor SM Mustafa Zaman, Secretary General, Association of Physicians of Bangladesh, and several others presented research findings in the scientific session. It was followed by an open discussion session moderated by Professor AHM Enayet Hussain, Additional Director General of Planning and Development of DGHS where Dr. Nur Mohammad, Line Director, NCDC Programme, Professor Dr. Afzalur Rahman, Director, National Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases, Professor MA Jalil Chowdhury, Secretary General, Bangladesh College of Physicians and Surgeons (BCPS) and National Professor Brigadier General (Rtd.) Abdul Malik, Founder and President, National heart Foundation attended. Representatives from different stakeholders also participated in the event and attended health check-up and BP measurement session on the occasion.

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